The Japanese Issue

Welcome to the first of a regular new series on international cinema at kamera.co.uk. Oliver Berry, the magazine editor, introduces the inaugural Japanese issue and outlines our plans for the future

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Dark Water

Dark Water

Hideo Nakata’s films command a cult global following, and his Ring films reminded Western audiences (and studios) of the true power of the horror film. Edward Lamberti investigates his latest film

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Dolls

The new film from Beat Takeshi makes a surprising move away from his proccupations with duty, loyalty and violence into much gentler emotional terrain. Is Beat Takeshi going soft in his old age? Ingo Ebeling doesn’t think so

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Japanese Cinema

Japanese Cinema

In the first article of our special Japanese issue, John Gorick provides a thorough overview of the history of Japanese cinema, and profiles some of its great directors

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Time of the Wolf

Time of the Wolf

Post-apocalypse stories have always been a popular genre in the cinema, but Michael Haneke’s version takes an unusual slant, focussing on the domestic side of life after armageddon. John Gorick isn’t impressed

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Hulk

Ang Lee has never been a director defined by convention, but his latest project must be one of his most ambitious – and weirdest films yet. Ian Haydn Smith has a blast in the company of everyone’s favourite pea-green superhero

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Plein Soleil

Plein Soleil

kamera’s coverage of the French noir season at the Ciné Lumière continues with this thriller from Réné Clement, which explored the adventures of Mr Ripley long before Anthony Minghella got in on the act. Edward Lamberti reports

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Jacques Becker

Jacques Becker

In our continuing series from the French Noir season at the Ciné Lumiere, Alex King looks back at the career of one of the country’s most underrated directors – Jacques Becker

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Ma Vie

Ma Vie

Digital video is quietly revolutionising the way we make and watch movies, and in the latest film from French filmmaking duo Olivier Ducastel and Jacques Martineau, DV becomes a central character. Antonio Pasolini investigates

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