Oldenburg Film Festival 2003

Oldenburg Film Festival 2003

Berlin may play host to Germany’s most prestigious film festival, but the thriving interest in domestic German cinema means there are lots of smaller festivals which can be just as rewarding. Marcelle Perks travels to Oldenburg for one of the best

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Le Chignon d’Olga

Le Chignon d’Olga

Young French directors seem to be leading the way in modern European cinema, and this absorbing study of bereavement and breakdown from Jerome Bonnell is no exception. Edward Lamberti applauds his "original take on familial grief"

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In The Cut

In The Cut

When comic actresses express a desire to ‘turn serious’, it’s usually time to head for the hills – but Meg Ryan’s performance in this moody noir-thriller from Jane Campion might just break the mould. John Atkinson has to take his hat off to her

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Interstella 5555

Interstella 5555

French house duo Daft Punk have crafted a reputation for making some of the weirdest and funniest in music, but their latest effort has surely got to take the cake. Paul Clarke reviews their fascinating new manga musical

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Intolerable Cruelty

Intolerable Cruelty

The critics may have dubbed it the Coen Brothers’ weakest film yet, but their homage to screwball comedy has all the wit and imagination you’d expect, and might also prove to be their biggest hit. Jon Ashton reports

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Underworld

Vampires, werewolves, tight-fitting catsuits, and enough high-octane action sequences to have the new Governor of California quaking in his size-thirteens – surely Underworld is modern horror’s answer to the Matrix? Ben McCann doesn’t think so

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Mystic River

Mystic River

Believe it or not, Clint Eastwood has been directing for over thirty years, and Mystic River is his 24th film behind the camera. Thessa Mooij reviews another provocative and thoughtful drama from the man with no name

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Dans Ma Peau

Dans Ma Peau

A drama about a woman who cuts herself with a variety of razor-sharp implements may not be everyone’s idea of the perfect night out at the pictures – but that doesn’t mean it’s not worth watching, says Bob Carroll

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Kill Bill Vol 1

Kill Bill Vol 1

It’s taken six years, several stalled projects, and enough wild rumours to fill a year’s subscription to Vanity Fair, but finally, the fourth Tarantino film has arrived. Paul Clarke reports on the kung-fu flick which proves Quentin is back – with a vengeance

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Concert For George

Concert For George

When George Harrison died earlier this year, a few of his close friends decided to put on a show in his memory. The result? One of the greatest concerts in rock and roll history. Elke de Wit reports on the film that followed

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Kill Bill Press Conference

Kill Bill Press Conference

They swept into town with all the subtlety of a Shaw Brothers finale, and were gone before you could say chop-socky – but Ben Walters managed to catch up with Quentin and the gang at the official Kill Bill press conference at the Dorchester Hotel

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Spellbound

Spellbound charts the fortunes of eight young hopefuls competing in the annual Scripps Howard National Spelling Bee, and has garnered huge critical acclaim, as well as a nomination for best documentary at this year’s Oscars. Paul Clarke reports

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A Quick Chat with Jeff Blitz

A Quick Chat with Jeff Blitz

In a special interview with kamera.co.uk, Jeff Blitz, the director of Spellbound, talks with Paul Clarke about the making of the film, the joys of credit cards, and his own standard of spelling

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Bright Young Things

Bright Young Things

It’s a story that seems tailor-made for Steven Fry – a group of delicately wasted young socialites in thirties London living on a diet of parties, personal dramas and effortless bon mots. Jon Ashton enjoys a "drug-augmented episode of Jeeves & Wooster"

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Young Adam

Young Adam

Based on Alexander Trocchi’s cult novel, the second film from writer-director David Mackenzie stars Ewan Macgregor as an alienated young man working on a coal barge in 1950s Britain. Jon Ashton salutes a "mature, impressive film"

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The Shawshank Redemption

The Shawshank Redemption

Though it bombed during its initial cinematic release, Frank Darabont’s life-affirming prison tale The Shawshank Redemption has taken on a life of its own on video and DVD. Ben McCann reviews a new critical take on the film from Mark Kermode

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