Get Carter (The British Film Guide 6)

Get Carter (The British Film Guide 6)

It may be one of the undisputed classics of British cinema, but until recently Get Carter has received relatively little critical appreciation. Graeme Cole reckons this new study is "a fascinating celebration of a vital, iconic British movie"

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Victim

Victim is the last in a trio of recent re-releases from one of Britain’s most underappreciated directors, Basil Dearden. Ben McCann applauds a surprisingly frank story of homosexuality and middle-class prejudice in the swinging Sixties

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The Grifters

The Grifters

Stephen Frears has never been a director who has confined himself to one genre. The Grifters was his first foray into film noir, but almost never features in critical discussions of the genre. Tim Applegate thinks it deserves a second look

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The Dreamers

The Dreamers

Bernardo Bertolucci has returned for another tango in Paris with The Dreamers, the story of a menage-à-trois between three cinema-obsessed teenagers during the protests of 1968. Edward Lamberti thinks the film "lacks an overall sense of organisation or purpose"

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School of Rock

School of Rock

Having already made one classic high school movie – the immortal Dazed & Confused – Richard Linklater has returned to the genre in the company of everyone’s favourite rotund comedy rocker, Jack Black. Deryck Swan salutes them both

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The League of Gentlemen

The League of Gentlemen

The crime caper was once a staple of the British cinema, and no one handled the formula better than Basil Dearden. He might not be very well known these days, but these Carlton re-releases might bring a new audience to his films. Ben McCann reports

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Elephant

The Columbine massacre still seems to be casting a long shadow across American imaginations. Gus Van Sant’s Elephant is the latest film to be inspired by the tragedy, and won the Palme d’Or at Cannes last year. Todd Harbour thinks it was a deserving winner

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Noi Albinoi

Noi Albinoi

If Bjork is anything to go by, life in Iceland must be pretty weird. Dagur Kari’s new film does little to dispel the idea, following the strange adventures of a teenage misfit in a rural Icelandic town. Tim Smedley finds out more

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Rotterdam Film Festival

Rotterdam Film Festival

With so many film festivals on the European circuit, programmers are finding it increasingly difficult to make their event stand out. In a so-so year at the Rotterdam Film Festival, Thessa Mooij found the best new work came from the Balkans

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Kiss Of Life

Kiss Of Life

There have been several quietly effective low-budget British films over the last year, suggesting a new wave of decent home-grown directors might be on its way. Laurence Boyce reviews the debut film from young Brit director Emily Young

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A Mighty Wind

A Mighty Wind

After their penetrating exposé of competitive dog handling, Best In Show, the Spinal Tap boys are back with a mockumentary about sixties folk acts. It’s still funny – but Stuart Henderson thinks the formula is wearing thin

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The Texas Chainsaw Massacre Companion

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre Companion

It may be one of the most influential horror films of all time, but until now The Texas Chainsaw Massacre has received relatively little critical attention. This new book sets out to change all that – but Laurence Boyce finds there’s something missing

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The Last Samurai

The Last Samurai

Hollywood has never been great at foreign history. Tom Cruise’s new film has been criticised for oversimplifying the story of the demise of the Japanese samurai, but Deryck Swan thinks it represents a new stage in the Cruiser’s career

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Sylvia

It’s been a bad week for the BBC. In the wake of the Hutton Report comes a fresh storm of controversy over their new film on the life of Sylvia Plath. Paul Clarke reviews the biopic nobody wanted made

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Big Fish

Big Fish

After the debacle of Planet of the Apes, Tim Burton has returned to more familiar territory with Big Fish, the story of a man who lives his life wrapped up in fantasy and fairy tale. Sound familiar? Stuart Henderson thinks so

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